Tuesday, June 30, 2015

#1124 sly

Every month, I give my dogs a flea treatment that involves pouring medicine on their back along their collar line.  

They. Hate. It.

Invariably, it causes them to thrash and roll and act as if I have just doused them in acid.  It is a ritual that we all dread.

So last weekend, they were chomping away on the bones I acquired from a butcher.  They seemed oblivious to everything, so I slid up behind them and applied the medicine.

They did not flinch.  Instead, they kept chewing and wagging and enjoying that moment in life.

Think about how you can create a setting so compelling that your employees become engrossed in their activity and fail to notice the negative aspect that you introduce.  Can you turn an envelope-stuffing party into a social event?  Or make a project a competition to put the focus on the goal instead of the task at hand?  Perhaps you can promise an early dismissal if the chore is accomplished on time?

Completing an unpleasant task doesn't need to cause a ruckus if the environment is right.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Monday, June 29, 2015

#1123 roll the dice

Over the weekend, I bought a Yahtzee game for 10 cents at a garage sale.  It was a childhood favorite that I haven't played in a long time.

For those of you who don't know (or don't remember!), Yahtzee is a dice game that scores in three main areas:
> The "top" part, where if you amass 63 points (equivalent to three each of 1-6 on the dice), you receive a 35 point bonus
> The "bottom" part, with miscellaneous categories like 4 of a kind, straights and full house
> Yahtzee, where you earn 50 points for getting all five dice the same in three rolls.

As I was playing, it occurred to me that the format of Yahtzee is a metaphor for goals in life:
> You need to tend to the basics first (the "top") and ensure you get enough points to earn the bonus or you will surely lose
> The bottom allows for more flexibility, and could represent longer-term goals
> And Yahtzee is a long-shot, but something you try for anyway.

There is also a "chance" category, where you can put whatever you rolled without needing it to fit into a category.  Leaving yourself enough flexibility for "chance" is a good strategy as well.

If you just aim for Yahtzee or only focus on the bottom portion, it is doubtful that you will succeed.  But if you pay attention to all the sections, life will have more strategy than just rolling the dice.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com





Sunday, June 28, 2015

#1122 stamped

For many people, getting the mail out of their box is nothing special.  Usually it is filled with advertisements, bills, credit card offers, solicitations for donations and not much more.

But what if you opened your mailbox to find a coconut?!  Or a sombrero?  Or a pillow?  Or a lime?

You may think it's crazy, but these are among the many things that the U.S. Post Office will mail without additional packaging.  For more ideas, click here:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/michelleporucznik/21-things-youd-be-surprised-you-can-actuall-mu8x#.fs8AVXk1E8

If you're like me, I suspect that you never even considered taking a piƱata to the USPS without first putting it in a box.  

We impose our own restrictions, far beyond what is necessary.  Push your thinking and don't hide your next idea in a metaphorical (or real!) envelope.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Source:  21 Things You'd Be Surprised You Can Actually Mail by Michelle Porucznik, BuzzFeed.com, April 6, 2014

Thanks to Gayle for the reference


Saturday, June 27, 2015

#1121 weaving happiness

I recently spend some unanticipated time at O'Hare.  Most people who found themselves delayed spent the time "waiting."  A few were reading books or newspapers, but most people frivoled away the hour(s) without doing anything productive.

Not this woman.  She travels with her very own spindle and spent the time turning dyed sheep's wool into usable yarn.  Given the amount of time we were at the gate, she was able to produce almost a full skein of yarn that she would later use for knitting.




But more than being productive, she was content; even happy about the "extra" time to practice her craft.

What hobby can you develop that is portable and allows you to take advantage of waiting time?  It may not be as elaborate as carrying around your own weaving loom, but I hope there is something out there that brings you as much satisfaction the next time you find yourself in a queue.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Friday, June 26, 2015

#1120 ambassador

I recently was in Washington, DC and had the good fortune to stay on Embassy Row.  I love that part of the city where streets are lined with mini-museums and cultural artifacts representing the countries whose embassies are stationed there.

There are 176 nations who have embassies in Washington, and I am always surprised at the scale and depth of their buildings.  Tiny Republic of Cote d'loire (an Ivory Coast country I will admit I never heard of before) has three attached buildings taking up almost half a block.  Likewise for Greece, the occupant of prime real estate as their country fends off loan defaults.  It is a mini-United Nations as each country finds ways to express its culture and personality amidst the DC row houses.

I began to think of the concept of embassy, defined as "a permanent diplomatic mission."* Why does it only have to be countries that establish such relationships?

Could you have an embassy to another office in your organization with whom you need to cooperate -- and negotiate -- and be friendly even when you disagree?  Would it change the perspective if one of your employees (or you) were named the "ambassador" to another organization?  How would you approach your relationship with others if you saw yourself fostering a permanent diplomatic mission instead of just a one-time transaction?

The United States has embassies in 307 locations.  Where should you assign your ambassadors?

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

*Source for definition and numbers:  Wikipedia




Embassy of Latvia

Sign says:  "Nice to meet you.  Honestly."
 Art outside the Indonesian Embassy
Two of the buildings part of the complex for 
the Embassy of the Republic of Cote d'lvoire

Thursday, June 25, 2015

#1119 lifeline

I recently had to drive for about an hour in a dense fog.  Thank goodness for the white line on the side of the road or I would not have made it.

I know that line is there all the time, but I usually don't pay attention to it.  I suppose at night it becomes a subconscious guide, but for the most part I don't even notice its existence. 

Yet, in fog or bad weather, that white stripe becomes an essential lifeline for a driver.

Try to be like that line for your employees: where they are mostly unaware that you are guiding them, but you are always there when they need you.

It's a good style to drive an organization.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

#1118 potluck

I heard a speech where a potluck was described as a symbol of trust.  His premise: We take potlucks at face value, believing that what is there is good and untainted (by heat, mishandling or ill intentions).  We believe that to be true, even though life is not always like that.

Potlucks also represent a metaphor for the life choices we make:

Do you take whatever looks good, and think that everyone else can too?
Do you decide about each thing as you come to it without a strategy or plan?
Do you think you can throw away what you don't like and take more of what you do?
Do you keep your options open and don't commit until you see the whole spread?
Do you "cheat" a little or make disciplined choices?
Do you take the last piece or leave it in consideration of others?

I have not thought of potlucks the same since I heard this talk.  Life is much more like a potluck than the more common smorgasbord metaphor.  Potlucks are irregular.  They feature specialties as well as experiments.  They put combinations together that would never be served at the same meal otherwise.  They allow us to try things, reject them or go back for more.  It is not all laid out for us; you need to work at it and contribute.

Think of your life as a potluck.  You may not know what you are eating, but you just may love it anyway.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

"Friendly Enemies: American Culture, Political Correctness, and Catholic Social Teaching" lecture by Dr. Stan Nussbaum, November 13, 2014




Tuesday, June 23, 2015

#1117 energy

The more energy you give to something bigger than yourself, the more energy you have.

Billy Graham had profound words to take to heart when we are feeling down or undervalued.  Giving your time and talents unselfishly will actually grow your energy instead of depleting it.  

What is a cause that is bigger than your individual needs that would benefit from your contribution?  If you are a leader, how can you frame your mission to empower others to reach for greatness?  How can you draw energy by focusing on the big picture (and, as Simon Sinek says, "The Why") instead of limiting people to the micro?

It is a paradox, but true: energy is limitless only if you give it away.


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com

@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com



Monday, June 22, 2015

#1116 bulletin

I don't think the days are far away when bulletin boards will have gone the way of the typewriter.  There will still be some around for nostalgic purposes, but most of them will have been replaced by digital signboards or LED scrolls.

It's a shame.

Bulletin boards are an art form.  The flyers they contain and even the placement of the bills convey a energy that is lost in the generic, electronic versions.  

Bulletin boards have personality.  They invite people to interact with messages they may have ignored, had they not been posted in vibrant colors with accompanying artwork.

A picture is truly worth a thousand words.

If you cross paths with a thriving bulletin board, take a moment to soak in the energy it emits and smile at the vibrancy that surrounds you.  

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com



Sunday, June 21, 2015

#1115 comfort

I wonder why Macaroni and Cheese is making a comeback?  There is so much emphasis on healthy food, yet good 'ole mac & cheese is popping up on menus and in magazines across the country.

As if pasta cooked in butter and covered in cheese isn't bad enough, now it comes "loaded", with multiple cheeses blended together, or covered with any number of extra toppings.  You can easily get mac & cheese with peppers, chili, mushrooms, ham, shrimp, tofu, meatballs, vegetables and of course, bacon.

Even those on a healthy regimen can splurge on rare occasions.  Perhaps it is as much the nostalgia in addition to the taste that this particular dish engenders.  Or maybe life is so stressful that comfort food becomes a solace every now and then.

How can you take a lesson from the growing popularity of macaroni and cheese?  Can you update a classic and link it to an emotional experience for your customers?  Is there something you can provide that is indulgent, but may be the welcome comfort that others seek?  

There may be times when bad is good!

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com










Saturday, June 20, 2015

#1114 the bubble

In the training video for Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni describes a scenario he has encountered.

In one instance, when someone encounters another on the street, he says: "Good morning," but in his head, like in a cartoon bubble above him, the thought really is "go away."

In another situation, when someone encounters another on the street, he says "Go away" but really means "good morning."

It's a stereotypical exaggeration, but Lencioni utilizes it to make his point that oftentimes people say one thing and mean or think another.  Culture influences what is acceptable to say or share, but we edit or filter thoughts on our own.

The incongruence of what is said and what is unsaid often leads to issues of distrust.  If you say you like something, I take you at your word.  It's hard to do again after I learn that in a different setting you disliked it, but just did not want to tell me.

The point of Lencioni's illustration is that more times than not, what comes out of our mouths and what is in the bubble above us should be the same message.  

Consistency is the sound of integrity.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Friday, June 19, 2015

#1113 moving

'Tis the season for moving, and there seems to be much of it going on.  

The neighbors next door to me were transferred out of state.  For two days, the semi was parked in front of their house and much hammering, packing and loading took place.  As the truck pulled away, I wondered where their home was at that moment.  

It wasn't the house that was now empty, even though all three of their children had been born while it was their home.

It wasn't the house where they were going to, since it, too, was vacant at the moment.

Was it actually on the moving truck, which contained all the possessions that were precious?

Or was it simply where they were at the moment -- in the car, in transit?  My mother always said: "everyone lives somewhere," and that part is true. 

Take care not to become too attached to a physical place.  Given the transitory nature of our work and lives, I think it is better to spend your energy creating memories, cultures and feelings that can transcend one locale.  

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Thursday, June 18, 2015

#1112 patterns

A friend sent me an article about a foundation that is studying 3,000 golden retrievers to determine why the lifespan of the breed is shrinking.  They are interested, not only because they are golden lovers like I am, but because these dogs and humans share 95% of the same DNA.  (No wonder they act like people!)

Volunteers keep journals of all types of details: interaction with new types of people, food changes, moves, environmental factors, sleeping patters and changes in temperature.  The researchers hope to discover patterns that may account for the unusually high incidents of bone cancer and lymphoma in the breed.

I wonder what they will discover, and more so I wonder what factors have contributed to my health today.  What did I do in my childhood that helped strengthen my immune system?  What seemingly incidental things made a difference -- one way or the other -- without conscious effort?

One of the gifts of technology is that it allows us to amass vast amounts of data and detect tiny patterns within it.  Will people allow access to their data collected via wearable technology to contribute to pattern-building?  Will volunteer parents journal everything about their newborn's upbringing as the dog-owners are doing?  

I recently heard that "in order to master the macro, we need to manage the micro.*"  How can you look at your data from the macro, and ensure that you collect enough of the micro to create a pattern that matters?

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Source:  Golden retrievers' shorter lifespan focus of research by Sue Manning for the Associated Press in The Detroit News, May 7, 2015, p. 14A

*As quoted by Jeff Cufaude at NACA Retreat, May 2015



Wednesday, June 17, 2015

#1111 undeclared

We are getting ready for our freshmen orientation programs, and, no matter how hard we try, there will always be that emphasis on declaring a major.  

I applaud those students who are brave enough to admit that they don't have one. Yet.  

Isn't college supposed to be a place of discovery where you can ignite passions you did not know you had?

The problem with many people -- parents and freshmen alike as well as so many others -- is that they equate majors with jobs.  That may be true in a few technical areas, but for the most part, majors = skills and SKILLS = jobs.  Majors (often) do not equal jobs.

And skills can be learned in a variety of venues, including classrooms, but certainly outside of them too: teamwork on an athletic field; discipline in a choir room; budgeting in a student programming office; time management in a research lab and professionalism in a on-campus job site.  And certainly the skills learned through the liberal arts can take you far -- in any career.

So to all those college freshmen out there getting ready to sign up for your first semester of classes:  don't worry about not knowing your major.  Own it, and soak in all you can with a smorgasbord of courses to find what you savor the most.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

#1110 old is new

I was recently enjoying a summer day at a public terrace along the lake.  A group of middle-aged women pulled out a selfie stick and crowded together to take a photo.  

I was surprised to see this demographic using a stick, but even more surprised when a twenty-something guy approached the table and asked if he could borrow it.  The woman shared it, and then moments later was giving a tutorial on how to sync the remote and actually use the stick.

It was refreshing to see the older generation actually teaching the younger crowd something about the latest technology, and this young guy being confident enough to ask for help from someone who could have been his mother.

There aren't a lot of opportunities for inter-generational interactions these days. My new neighbors next door said they were attracted to the area because there are a mix of ages here, something that never occurred to me before.  Someone pointed out that it is present in the community band whose concerts I attend in the park, but for the most part people have contact with people like themselves.

What can you do today to have a conversation with someone who is decades apart from you in age?  Try to understand their perspective to enhance your world view and learn something new -- especially if it is the "latest latest" as depicted in the cartoon below.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


6-10-2015 by Hilary Price

Monday, June 15, 2015

#1109 analogies

Sometimes the strongest lessons come from simple analogies.  Such is the case with this example from a high school teacher.

Please click:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/nathanwpyle/this-teacher-taught-his-class-a-powerful-lesson-about-privil?utm_term=.eaYgKzvLV#.ee2qgvV0gV

This was a no cost way to illustrate a complex point.  Whether you agree with his lessons or not, there is no doubt that the exercise would have sparked a discussion.

The next time you need to make a complex point, as a character lesson, project presentation, teaching moment or civility reminder, keep in mind that an analogy may be the best way to have that lesson heard.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Link to This teacher taught his class a powerful lesson about privilege by Nathan W. Pyle, Buzzfeed.com, November 21, 2014, 12:30pm

Thanks to Amy N. for sharing

Sunday, June 14, 2015

#1108 wide

I recently was in the school supply section of a college bookstore.  While it was no surprise that I was roaming the aisles of some of my favorite products, I do so in part because I find something new there every time I go.

Today's find was a set of legal pads -- with the orientation turned landscape instead of portrait.  Now why haven't they thought of this before?  It is advertised as allowing you to "work in computer screen dimensions", something that could be very handy for those trying to replicate items on the screen.

There are likely many applications for a pad that is wide instead of long.  Math formulas, a list of quotes, names and addresses, specific website addresses or reference citations come to mind.  The format may be preferable for commuters who are trying to write on their laps while en route or someone who wants a pad that orients the same way as their tablet or laptop.  

Just looking at a wide pad forces you to think outside the box and change your perspective.  Anything that can achieve that is a good thing!

How can you change the orientation of an everyday product that you use today?  

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


Saturday, June 13, 2015

#1107 oblivious

I recently discovered a local butcher that sells large bones, so I purchased two as a treat for my dogs.

Nirvana!

The dogs were mesmerized -- for two hours in each of two sittings.  

Normally, my slightest movement alerts them.  But while they were on the patio totally engrossed in chewing, I went in and out of the house, watered plants, wrote blogs and generally was ignored.  Other people walked by unnoticed, though normally they would have caused a major ruckus.  While the bones were present, nothing else was.

How can you cultivate a similar passion and focus in your world today?  May you find something that brings you such joy that when you're doing it, you become oblivious to the rest of the world!

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Friday, June 12, 2015

#1106 loophole

There are times when a decision solves one problem and leads to another.  Oftentimes, the loophole leads to unintended consequences that are as bad or worse than the original situation.

Such is the case with the airlines.  U.S. carriers collected a record $6.4 billion in fees in 2014*, an ever-escalating category of revenue for them.  

Why have fees become so commonplace in the past five years?  Because in 2009, the IRS ruled that "ancillary fees" (bags and ticket changes) are not subject to taxation**.  Of course, the airlines are going to focus on fees.  Such practices generate not only big bucks, but it is even more lucrative revenue as the $6 billion is tax-free!

I am not sure why Congress or the IRS itself isn't acting swiftly to change this, but it seems that the one lobbying for restructuring is the U.S. Travel Association.  This group is promoting the exchange of five passenger taxes with one passenger facility charge to "remove the airlines' incentive to shelter mass amounts of revenues in fees."*

As households and businesses across the country are looking for nickels and dimes in their operating budgets, it seems unconscionable that the government knowingly lets such taxation revenue slip away. 

I'm sure the original law enacted in 2009 had noble intentions, but it seems time to develop a new flight path that lands at the IRS.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Sources:
* Travel group calls for aviation changes by Gregory Karp for the Chicago Tribune in the Telegraph Herald, June 6, 2015, p. 4B

** U.S. airlines collected a record $6.4 billion in bag and change fees in 2014 by Dan Peltier for Skift.com, May 4, 2015, 5:00pm.




Thursday, June 11, 2015

#1105 I spy

While out walking, many people enjoy music via headphones.  I prefer to use the time to stretch some of my creativity muscles in addition to exercising my limbs, so I often play "I Spy" in my head.

It follows the same principles as the version you played as a kid, but the concepts become more abstract and often come in contrasting sets.

Examples -- Spy something:
> tended to and something neglected
> modern and something old fashioned
> I love and something I loathe
> innovative
> repurposed
> joyful
> clever
> funny
> with a double meaning (e.g.: piece of hay-like straw and a drinking straw)
> here before I was born
> new since my last walk
> in an off beat color (e.g.: salmon)

Usually I pick one or two categories for my walk and continuously evaluate to find "the best" example to illustrate the category.  This stretches my don't-settle-for-the-first-right-answer muscle in addition to my creative noodle.

Consider leaving the iPhone at home next time and trying some free mental gymnastics.  I guarantee you'll see things on your walk that you missed by wearing your blinders, er, I mean headphones.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com



Wednesday, June 10, 2015

#1104 in or out

As part of a leadership program I'm in, I recently spent time talking with senior leaders about their philosophies and styles.  

One of the most striking differences among the people I talked to was the value they placed on external commitments.  For some, involvement in the community, boards, national associations and other similar forms of volunteer service were an essential part of the role.  Another believed it to be more prudent to minimize the time away from the home office and to focus on the internal work at hand.

Both are right for their personality, length in the position and the environment they are leading.  What I took away from the conversation was that opportunities will present themselves, and it is best if you have an intentional strategy of how to evaluate them and respond.

Even if you are not the CEO, you will likely be faced with similar decisions at any point in your career.  Do you coach Little League or serve your professional organization? Will being a Girl Scout leader allow you to still be visible at events on campus?  Do you need to choose between serving on the school board and leading a major project at work?

Knowing how much time to spend "in" and how much to devote to "out" has consequences either way.  Evaluate what you give and what you get before you make a decision.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

#1103 exit 12

When we were kids, vacation consisted of many weekend camping trips to local parks and one "big" vacation to the shores of Lake Michigan.  

The trip to the Lake was a monumental journey for our family.  We went through three states: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan.  We were in a different time zone.  They had deposit on cans and different stores. We had to wait through many toll booth lines. It was like going to another country for us.

We stopped going for many years, and then the siblings decided to make a reunion trip there.  We got out a map and looked all along the shoreline for the park we had frequented, but could not find it.  It turns out we were looking in the wrong place.

We felt like we were in Northern or at least Central Michigan because we had traveled "so far".  In reality, where we camped was at Exit 12 in Michigan!  With open road tolling and no camper to pull, you could make the trip in under two hours.  But never did we imagine we were only 100 miles away.  

Our parents were on to something. They created an experience that was special, memorable and attainable.  It was within reality for them to provide, yet made us feel rewarded and giddy.  We looked forward to the trip and enjoyed it as much as we would had we traveled much further.

Think about how you can replicate this illusion within your organization.  Can you provide a perk that your employees cherish that won't break the bank? (e.g.: closing at 3pm on summer Fridays)  Or what about offering something of value to your clients that makes them feel important for being affiliated with you? (e.g.: free tickets to an exhibit my bank is sponsoring)  What can you do to alter the experience into something that becomes special? (e.g.: having a hot dog cookout during Bring Your Dog to Work Day)  Or how can you maximize the experience by paying attention to a few select parts of it? (e.g.: vacation in Quebec with a different language)

You, too, can make Exit 12 feel exotic and special if you try.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com





Monday, June 8, 2015

#1102 powerless

Last week, my electric toothbrush died.  One minute my molars were getting polished, and the next minute the rotations puttered to nothing.

When I went to the store to purchase a new one, I discovered that there were lots of choices, and that except for the price tag, they all looked alike on the shelf.  So I went home, did some research, found one to purchase, brought it home and plugged it in.

Nothing.  It was as dead as the original.

It turns out that the problem was the outlet, not the toothbrush itself.  It's the only thing on that circuit, so I did not know until the battery wore down. Lots of time wasted on solving the wrong problem.  

The next time you have a dilemma, even if it is one that seemingly has a simple solution, take a minute to assess the situation.  For the time it takes to brush your teeth, you could save yourself lots of aggravation.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Sunday, June 7, 2015

#1101 not your grandfather's

When I think of "gourmet", I think of (someone else) making known items taste better: richer chocolate, creamier sauce, more tender beef, premium vegetables.  But it seems to no longer be enough to make things better; now the quest is to make things different.

I recently was offered a "haute chocolate" bar from an assortment.  My choices:  hickory smoked almond, reishi mushroom and walnut, coconut ash & banana, uncured smoked bacon and smoked salt, peanut butter with pink Himalayan salt and Maldon sea salt, Tibetan goji berries, Rogue Ale's chocolate stout beer, burnt sugar caramel and Alderwood smoked salt, acai & golden berries or pomegranate & yogi.  

I did not know where to begin.  When has chocolate expanded from milk chocolate and dark chocolate to this? 

These bars came with directions on how to enjoy an "exotic" chocolate bar:  see, smell, snap (eat two pieces at a time), taste -- by pressing a small piece to the roof of your mouth and letting the sumptuous taste melt on your tongue, and the texture on your palate.

It appears that chocolate has also gained health benefits.  The coconut ash and banana is a "superfood" that offers detoxification, enhanced brain function and general wellness.  Reishi mushroom & walnut and the acai & golden berries are also superfoods, providing stress reduction, heart health and enhanced brain function.  

These bars are just another example of creating an experience around what you offer.  Whether it be chocolate, service, business, education or entertainment, there is room for innovation in ways unthinkable before.  How can you repackage what you are offering in a way that turns heads if not taste buds?

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com





Saturday, June 6, 2015

#1100 greener

I wrote yesterday about the specificity involved on construction sites.  Apparently the forethought and planning doesn't always continue after the building is built.

I recently saw this strip of grass that continued for several blocks:

There was a full complement of grass on the other side of the sidewalk, but only this 6" band between the sidewalk and the street.

I wonder whether someone thought this was a good idea, or, more likely, just blindly followed the code to make the sidewalks X" wide.  They could have benefited from one of those weekly construction meetings!

If you are faced with carrying out instructions that may sound good on paper, but have some issues when they intersect with reality, I hope you care enough to question them.  

The grass may be greener on the other side of the sidewalk, but only if there is enough of it to matter.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Thanks to bg for pointing this out to me!