Tuesday, December 31, 2013

#578 beginning

Martha Stewart started her career with a simple catering business out of her basement.  As she told Oprah, "And then I realized the business had better be documented somehow, because if I ever was to have grandchildren, they would not know what Grandma had been doing in that kitchen.  So I documented it in a book called Entertaining, and that totally turned the tide for me, because then I became a real expert."

Think about things that you do which could benefit from documentation.  Maybe it's not a book (yet), but do you need the recipe for "Mom's famous dish" that you had over the holidays?  Can your sister show you how to tie those magnificent bows?  Maybe you need directions to that great little restaurant or the name of that fabulous wine you shared?  

At work, we could all benefit from having a "If-I'm-Hit-By-a-Bus" procedures manual, but we can also document things for special projects, strategy sessions, orientation processes and more.

Martha's Entertaining started her empire.  What talents do you have that could (should?) be documented and shared with others?  There's nothing like a new year to resolve to start writing.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Source:  Oprah interview of Martha Stewart, September 2000 "O" Magazine, p. 302

Monday, December 30, 2013

#577 the buzzer

Over the holidays I was able to watch my nephew play in a high school basketball tournament.  The game was engaging, partially because we were ahead for the entire contest -- until the 2 minute mark.  At that juncture we were up by 10 points, but suddenly the team made some turnovers and allowed a few three-point shots to be scored against them -- and to overtime we went. 

And then to double overtime -- and our guy scored a free throw with seconds remaining -- but the ref said that his foot was on the line.  So the bucket did not count and we headed into triple overtime.

After all that, unfortunately we lost the hard-fought contest.  The players were physically exhausted; the fans were emotionally exhausted and it was a sad way to end the afternoon.

I thought back to the final two minutes -- oh, if we could replay them again.  Take a lesson from this game and resolve to keep up the intensity until the very end -- even if it appears that such an expenditure of energy is not necessary.  The game isn't over until the final buzzer sounds.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Sunday, December 29, 2013

#576 two rules

A Guest Services Coordinator shared two rules that she lives by:

1.  The best idea wins (no matter who has it)

2.  Everything affects everything else.

Based on this alone, I am sure she is fantastic in her job.  How can you adopt her wisdom an apply it in your own world?

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Source:  Furman University 2008

Saturday, December 28, 2013

#575 a minute

In days gone by, people wrote long letters to each other to keep up on thoughts and news. Today, our contacts have become much shorter.  Even an email seems long as compared to a "Like" on Facebook, a quick text, a SnapChat or other modern forms of communication.

On one hand, this makes it much easier to keep connected with people.  No need for a large block of time to write or call; you can say "I'm thinking of you" in a few seconds.  I liken it to sending a postcard instead of a letter.

On the other hand, the speed at which we can communicate elevates expectations about frequency.  Clients, family and friends all have so many contacts coming to them, that if we are out of touch, for many we likely are also out of mind.

How do you incorporate a system to keep in touch with those who are important to you? Instead of being daunted by the prospect, think of it as spending one of your 1,440 minutes each day letting someone else know that they're on your mind.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


Friday, December 27, 2013

#574 hostas

"Gift bags are the hostas of gift wrapping."

My sister said that when we were at the wrapping party (described in blog #569).  What she meant by her saying was that when you don't really want to garden, you plant hostas.  When you don't really want to wrap, you use gift bags.

But I took it to mean that gift bags, like hostas, never seem to go away.  I split my plants and try to reduce their number, but somehow I always have huge plants in the garden anyway.  I occasionally use gift bags, but invariably I am given more gifts in bags and my inventory seems to grow instead of diminish.

Is there something in your organization that seems to linger, despite your best attempts to rid yourself of it?  A tradition that won't die?  A problem client that never leaves you?  An unresolved sticky situation that keeps rearing its ugly head?

There are things in every organization that are like hostas -- nearly impossible to kill.  Treat your hosta situation the same way you treat those plants -- with minimal energy and attention.  They will live on without any effort from you.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


Thursday, December 26, 2013

#573 steps

Sometimes it feels like we are walking on a long journey with nothing to show for our steps. We could take a lesson from artist Simon Beck who journeys through the snow and creates intentional patterns for the enjoyment of others. 

Take a moment to admire his amazing artistry:
http://angelicview.wordpress.com/2013/12/15/man-walks-all-day-to-create-massive-snow-patterns/

Beck knows that the nature of his work is temporary and will either melt away or be covered with a new snowfall, yet he still produces his art.  Many things others work on will be more lasting, yet many stop short of giving it the commitment that Beck does.

The next time you are involved in a project that does not produce immediate results, think of these images.  If you have the forethought and planning to know what journey you are on, and the persistence to walk the equivalent of "all day", you too can produce something majestic for your organization.  


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


Wednesday, December 25, 2013

#572 motive

The whole worth of a gift lies in the love that inspires it. -- Unknown

May your holiday be graced with gifts of love today.

Merry Christmas!

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

#571 on the shelf

Tonight is the last night for the Elf on the Shelf -- and for many of the millions of parents participating in this new tradition, it is a huge relief.  

I know a parent who woke up in a panic one night fearing that she forgot to move the figurine.  Others have told me stories about how the elf fell off the counter and they had to walk around it for a day (since you can't touch it).  Another elf landed on the doggie treat container, so a box from under the Christmas tree needed to be pressed into service for a day.  Another elf sat upon a light bulb in the bedroom chandelier and caught on fire!

But not all parents are stressed by the elf.  I heard a colleague tell of a mom who went over-the-top in embracing it.  Each day she created a new scenario for the elf.  Examples included:
> She put flour on the counter and the elf made snow angels in it
> The elf TP-ed the Christmas tree!
> The elf was found playing Scrabble with the other toys
> She purchased little red balls and made Rudolph noses on all the pictures in the house

It seems that, love it or hate it, the elf has added another layer of complexity to an already stressed season.  I remember no stories about advent calendars or setting cookies out for Santa.  

In our life and in our organizations, we should reevaluate whether something that requires a daily time commitment is truly worth it.  Maybe next year, the elf needs to stay on the shelf -- in the back of the closet!


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com




Monday, December 23, 2013

#570 taste tested

Those of you who know me know that I don't cook, so it was most unusual for me to be attracted to a "Holiday Baking" display at the local grocery.  But my eye was drawn to the packages of Hershey's Cinnamon chips (like chocolate chips only cinnamon flavor instead).  I could smell them through the package, and was hooked.

So in a rare display of cooking bravery (for me), I purchased not only the chips, but all the ingredients to make the recipe that was listed on the package.  There was no special occasion where I needed to bring a dish and I was trying an untested recipe -- neither happens with any regularity at my house!

It turns out that the Oatmeal Cinnamon bars are delicious.  Divine.  Addictive.  Fabulous.  I shared them with a friend, and sent some along with him to take to other friends and got a call for the recipe.  I have already made a second batch to share with my family -- and I hope they make it there without being eaten first.

While this recipe was new to me, I am sure that the fine cooks at Hershey's Kitchens taste-tested and tried hundreds of recipes before they selected the one to highlight.  In reality, the risk was very low, so it shouldn't be a surprise that the reward was high.

You can model this kind of behavior in your organization by trying new things that others have essentially pre-tested for you.  Utilize a software program in a way that others have used.  Try out an agency that comes with a trusted recommendation.  Hire a service that has done work in your industry.  

There are many ways to let others do the trial and error that minimize the risk you need to take.  Sometimes it works to trust the recipe on the package.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Oatmeal Cinnamon Bars
1 cup butter, softened
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 eggs
1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1-1/2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
2-1/2 cups quick-cooking oats
1 package Hershey's Cinnamon Chips
3/4 cup raisins

Heat oven to 350 degrees

Beat butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar in bowl until creamy.  Add eggs and vanilla; beat well.
Combine flour and baking soda; add to butter mixture, beating well.
Stir in oats, cinnamon chips and raisins.

Spread batter into lightly greased 13x9x2 baking pan.  Bake at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown.  Cool; cut into bars.

Enjoy!

Sunday, December 22, 2013

#569 that's a wrap

I love to wrap presents!  More than shopping for them or even opening them, my favorite part is the wrapping.

I have learned that others do not share my joy!

My sister, who lives five hours away, happened to schedule a meeting near me last November, so it was convenient for her to bring a van full of presents for me to wrap while she was in town.  I jumped at the chance to do so.

This year we met at a hotel two hours from me while she was en route to another meeting, and again I spent the afternoon/evening turning her bags and boxes into treasures.  I think we have created a new tradition.

Tomorrow, I am wrapping all the gifts for a colleague who won my wrapping services in our staff holiday raffle.  He had to bring them here from three hours away, but for him it was worth it to avoid the dreaded task.

Things I am wrapping are traveling more miles than I am this holiday season!  But it goes to show that one person's gift is another person's chore.  Try to find ways to align your talents with others' needs and you will both be delighted with the result.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Saturday, December 21, 2013

#568 new and improved

As most people know, I have two lovable golden retrievers.  While I am certainly not looking to add to my family, I have an irresistible urge to regularly read the pet section of the classified ads.  

What I have noticed is that there is rarely an advertisement for golden retriever puppies anymore.  Instead, the paper has several offerings of Goldendoodle pups -- in cream, black or even apricot.  Apparently this "no-shed, no-allergy" hybrid warrants a premium price as they sell for $700-$1500 and up for one little pooch.

I have a friend that has two adorable Goldendoodles.  They are great dogs and wonderful pets -- yet they are not anything close to a no-shed golden retriever.  The Goldendoodle is an entirely different animal, engineered through DNA cross-breeding.

At what point to we accept things as they are -- shedding hair and all -- or when is it desirable to alter the natural state of things to create something new?  I wonder where the line is drawn or how to know the difference.

With decisions, patience or even the breed of dogs, I am reminded of the Serenity Prayer:  God grant me the courage to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.

May you be graced with wisdom today.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Friday, December 20, 2013

#567 get your foot in

One of the ways organizations cultivate their farm system (as referenced in yesterday's blog) is through the use of interns.  People traditionally think of universities sending interns into the community, but we are also smart enough to keep some for ourselves!

We recently had a resignation, and rather than attempting a search during the holiday season, we immediately turned to our summer intern and hired him for a temporary position through June.  He had what amounted to a three-month interview last summer, so his hiring in this round consisted of one phone call and a verbal commitment.  It worked out well for everyone. 

Internships also lead to permanent positions, including the eventual leadership of the company.  General Motors' new CEO, Mary Barra, started work at the company as a "co-op student" while in college.  She has been with the organization ever since, holding senior positions in a multitude of divisions.  Her college work allowed her to be identified as someone who had a lot of potential, and she grew from there.

While formal internships aren't always available to those who hold full-time posts, you can create a pseudo one for yourself by volunteering outside your normal area of responsibility or serving on a project team for something new.  All are great ways for people in leadership roles to see your talents in action.

When a hiring manager has an opening, especially a sudden or unexpected one, the natural instinct is to think of "who do I know?" vs. "where can I place an ad?".  Have a stable of names from which you can pull talent -- or be one of the names that pops into a manager's head.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com

@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Thursday, December 19, 2013

#566 farm team

In yesterday's blog, I shared the roles that Harvard Business Review outlined for leaders. One that I think is often overlooked, but of critical importance is the role of talent scout.  I would add to that "talent developer" as it is rare that someone shows up at an interview with all the skills I need.

Part of my role as talent developer is being aware of the strengths of my staff (and other staff!) and then giving them personal encouragement to apply for different positions when a job comes open.  Currently there are several employees who used to work for me who are now working in elsewhere at the university, either for me in different roles or in another division entirely.  It is something that makes me quite proud.

In your role as leader, what are you doing to help your staff not only develop skills for their current role, but to prepare them for whatever comes next?  Are you conscious about matching strengths with openings -- even if it means moving one of your staff elsewhere to do it?  

You are only as good as the people who work for you.  Take a lesson from baseball and develop an on-going farm system to create and attract new talent to your organization.  

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

#565 hats

About 15 years ago, Harvard Business Review sent out a promotional mailing to encourage people to subscribe to the magazine.  One panel outlined a list of roles a leader played (and that presumably were addressed in the publication's content.)  I saved this flyer and have had them posted on my desk ever since.

The roles of a leader (circa 1999) were:
Strategist.  Mentor.  Visionary.  Talent Scout.  Guru.  Futurist.  Champion.  Leader.

I thought, and still think, that it is a very accurate list and reflects the roles I am asked to play on a regular basis.

It was interesting to me to receive a newer HBR advertisement; it had the same general format but included a new list:
Leader.  Strategist.  Mentor.  Architect.  Builder.  Coordinator.  Champion.

Gone are visionary, talent scout, guru, futurist -- replaced with architect, builder, coordinator.  Also gone is clear language -- replaced by metaphors! 

The first list, faded as it is, will remain in my office.  What roles would be on your list?  Sharpen your observational powers and watch what hats a leader you admire wears -- then try some on yourself.


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com




Tuesday, December 17, 2013

#564 idle eyes

One of my favorite fast food promotions was a few years ago at Culver's.  On their tray liners they had the outline of a large french fry.  If you received an actual fry with your order that was longer than their drawing, you won a free cup of custard.  It was simple and fun.  

Apparently the legacy of the large fry lives on.  Over the weekend, I was reading their french fry bag and learned that the longest Culver's fry measured 8.25 inches and sold for $250 in a charity fundraiser.

Invariably, your clients will have some down time while on site at your organization.  How can you capitalize on this and give them something entertaining (yet informative) to read?  Culver's uses tray liners, cups, table tents and even french fry bags to assure me of their quality.  

Does your waiting room contain more than just past issues of magazines?  Have you been intentional about the messages you are sharing about your organization while people wait?  Have you infused your brand in hallways, parking lots, lobbies and where lines form?

If you think about how many breakfast cereal boxes you have read, you'll know that no one is a more interested reader than someone who is waiting.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com


Monday, December 16, 2013

#563 discount

As I was finishing up my Christmas shopping over the weekend, I carried with me the multitudes of store coupons that I have received via newspaper, mail, on my phone, etc.  It seems that every place is running a special -- if you are patient enough to deal with the coupon hassle to receive it. 

At Younkers (a Bon Ton affiliate), they have more exclusions than inclusions for where the coupon actually works.  No Incredible Value items, cosmetics, premium brands, etc.  In short, it didn't work on anything that I wanted to buy.  Ditto at JCPenney where the brand I chose was part of the "exceptions."  

I tried using a coupon at Michaels, but I was at the wrong hour -- this coupon only worked on Sunday afternoon.  I felt bad for the clerk because I was obviously not the first person unamused by this detail.

And then there is Kohls.  Maybe I have simplicity on my brain because of the Ken Segall book I am reading on that subject, but they have coupons down pat.  I got 30% off of everything.  Every brand (even their Hallmark lines), every department, every item.  One coupon that works from now until December 24 (when I am sure I will receive my next discount.)  Kohls makes coupons an integral part of their overall simplified shopping strategy and it is clearly working for them.

Don't discount the importance of customer satisfaction around the little things.  It's a mistake to play around with your pricing policies just because everyone is doing it.  Even with something so mundane as store coupons, you can enchant your customers or frustrate them.  Guess where I'll shop next time.


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com

@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Sunday, December 15, 2013

#562 seven

I have long been familiar with the concept of the "seven deadly sins", but had to look them up to write this blog.  If you're curious, they are:

> wrath
> greed
> sloth
> pride
> lust
> envy
> gluttony

Ghandi took the concept in a different direction.  He is attributed with outlining these characteristics as the seven deadly social sins:

> politics without principle
> wealth without work
> commerce without mortality
> pleasure without conscience
> education without character
> science without humanity
> worship without sacrifice

Ghandi's social sins serve as a type of moral compass and encourage us to consider the implications of actions in addition to the action itself.  

In this season of giving, remember to give some of your time or treasure to organizations whose missions support the good works you believe in.  Principled organizations fighting for advocacy on the policy level.  Educational institutions at all levels that are helping to develop character.  Research functions that are working to alleviate human suffering.

Don't let greed and gluttony shape your December traditions.

-- beth triplett
@leadershipdots 



Saturday, December 14, 2013

#561 alike

I heard someone remark with wonder that "no two snowflakes are alike."  What caused me the amazement is that the other person seemed genuinely astonished by this.

What two things are alike?  I doubt that two leaves on a tree are identical or two pieces of fruit. 

Yesterday was registration day so our staff wore identical polo shirts, yet each expressed themselves in different ways.  "Polo and khakis" looked different on everyone.

Instead of focusing on the differences, even in little ways, we should appreciate the commonalities and the ties that bind us together on this journey.  

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Friday, December 13, 2013

#560 e-notebook?

After the recent entries about my notebook "system" I received a comment from one of my former colleagues about using an electronic system instead of paper.  I wrote back that I firmly believe in the paper system as I described it.  I added that one of the virtues of the paper system is that it is socially acceptable to flip through a few pages of a notebook in a meeting, while it may be considered rude/unfocused to be flipping through apps on your iPad to accomplish the same thing.


Brian wrote back with an interesting flipside to that observation: that at his institution as more and more people have iPads (part of a commitment to sustainability) "we’re almost to the point that you’re “judged” more for having a paper notebook than you are for scrolling through your iPad."

If you are at a similar place, or just prefer an electronic system, you can take pieces of Brian's strategies and apply them to your liking.  I think the key to any successful organizational system is that it works for you.  

So, in the spirit of sharing, here are Brian's ideas for electronic organization:

As for the high tech option: I use an app called “Evernote”.  It’s a great app that lets you take notes either by typing or handwriting (using the complementing app called “Penultimate”).  The nice features of this app that make me like it:

> It’s free; there are paid upgrades available, but, you can do basically everything you really need/want to do for free.
> There’s a desktop program you can download to your computer and have it sync with the notes; this makes them accessible from both devices automatically and helps with efficiency. 
> You can “scan” documents to add to your notes.
> You can “tag” notes to help organize them easily; you can also create “notebooks” to also help you organize your notes.
> You can send/share/etc your notes with other people.

Those are the features I generally like.  The WAY I use it is this:
> I create notes for each of my meetings; I have “running” notes for my recurring meetings.  Meaning, my 1-1 meetings with my staff, I have a  "1-1” note with the person's name and I just add to it by drawing a line & adding the newest meeting’s notes to the top of that page (so the most current is the first thing I see).  That way I don’t have to figure out which note I need to look up first.
> I take my notes from the meetings on that note and I use another cool feature of the program that allows you to actually create a checkbox for any items (i.e. “to-do” items).  You can then “check” them when you’re done.
> This is one of the keys: the “tagging” feature.  I can create as many tags as I want and I can attach as many tags to each note as I want.  So, I create tags like: “Staff”, “1-1s”, “Student Life”, etc – each of those may apply to 1 meeting so I put all those on that note, making it easier to find later and have it be related to other notes.  
> The key on this is creating the “To Do” tag – any note that I take that then contains one of those checkboxes gets tagged “To Do”.  When I’m taking time to follow up on those items, I just pull up all the notes tagged “To Do” and make my way through the list.  I then remove the “To Do” tag from the note when I’ve completed all the necessary tasks.

-- beth triplett and Brian Gardner
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com
 

Thursday, December 12, 2013

#559 essential duties

A colleague was telling me about someone in her organization who was recently let go.  "He was an enemy maker, not an ally maker," she said.  "I'm surprised she lasted as long as she did." 

In today's highly collaborative environment, making connections is part of everyone's job.  Be conscious about fulfilling that part of your responsibilities well.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

#558 significant

There are words that make their way into our vocabulary every day.  I wish someone would come up with new language that describes adult dating.  The current lexicon is a remnant of the "old days" when boys and girls dated in high school, then became boyfriend/girlfriend, then fiancĂ©, then spouse.

But what about two way-past-high-school people who are seeing each other?  Boyfriend/girlfriend has a twinge of high schoolishness.  "Friend" doesn't distinguish between someone you are dating and your buddy.  "Lady friend" seems more like an escort.  "Significant other" never appealed to me either -- even if I'm significant, do I want to be the "other"?  It sounds like something out of place.  "The guy I'm seeing" sounds like he just came out of hiding and now you see him.  

We have words that describe trivial details and labels for so much in pop culture, yet there isn't a good word for something that is a very common occurrence.  

The holidays are coming and introductions to family are awkward enough.  As a hostess, I struggle with how to ask my guests if they are bringing their _______.  We need a word or two to describe two adults in a relationship.  As I have said before, what you call something  is significant (not other!).


-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

#557 second best

In college admissions, a significant number of prospective students inquire about a school but never bother to complete an application.  The admission counselors are responsible for calling all these inquiries to assess their interest level and either encourage an application or inactivate the file.  

What counselors have come to understand, and students would be better off if they learned, is that the second best answer is "no".  Sure, counselors would love to have calls that connect with delighted students who are going to finish their application that very evening.  But hearing an honest answer from a student who is no longer interested is the next best thing.  It allows the counselor to cross them off the list, move on and stop spending time and money to cultivate someone who has no interest in attending.  

What happens instead is that a) the student doesn't answer the phone/email/text and it causes the school to keep trying to reach them or b) the student gives a vague answer and feigns interest, even though there really is none.  Again, it just prolongs the outreach.

The same thing happens in other lines of work.  Prospective clients are afraid to tell a business that they have no interest in their service/product.  People lead on sales agents and waste time instead of ending the conversation when a decision has been mentally made.

Do those on the receiving end a favor, and if your answer is going to be no, give that answer as soon as you know it.  No is far better than a "maybe".  In fact, "no" is only second to "yes" of what the seller wants to hear.  Really.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

Monday, December 9, 2013

#556 a light

Last week, South Africa and the world lost a special kind of leader.  After spending 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela became the country's "moral compass" and championed efforts to end the practice of apartheid.  He served as president for only five years (1994-1999), but leaves a legacy that outlives his time in office.

In a tribute to the impact he had beyond his own nation, the flags in the U.S. were flown at half-staff in his honor.  Four U.S. presidents* are each traveling nearly 16,000 miles round trip to pay their respects to Mr. Mandela.  They will be joined by at least 50 other world leaders at his memorial service tomorrow.

I doubt any of you will be jumping on a plane to head to South Africa, but you can pay tribute to his work by living out the challenge Marianne Williamson laid out at Mandela's inauguration:

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate; our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.  It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us.  We ask ourselves, "Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented and fabulous?"  Actually, who are you not to be?

You are a child of God.  Your playing small does not serve the world.  There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you.  We were born to manifest the glory that is within us.  As we let our light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.  As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

Have the courage to let your light shine brightly today.

-- beth triplett
leadershipdots.blogspot.com
@leadershipdots
leadershipdots@gmail.com

* Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton and Carter